An analysis of Amos Tutuola’s Palm Wine Drinkard

Authors

  • Bunmwakat Kate Sambo Department of English, Faculty of Arts University of Jos

Keywords:

beliefs, language, style, usage, palm wine

Abstract

This paper examined “the palm-wine drinkard.” by Amos Tutuola. Equipped with little formal education, Tutuola used the English language to tell his story using the first person singular ‘I’. He is a natural and one of the first Africa writers to contribute to Western literature. Reading through the novel, there were inconsistencies and disjointed presentations of ideas and facts. These did not however affect his good instinct as it rather turned his naïve ignorance and apparent limitation in language into a weapon of great strength. Tutuola simply opened his wings and rose higher. His feelings and the tools he employed to carry his intentions across to his readers are unique. The saying that ‘one man’s food is another man’s poison.' is apt. It is more of collections of short stories fused in the making of the novel. 

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Author Biography

  • Bunmwakat Kate Sambo, Department of English, Faculty of Arts University of Jos

    Bunmwakat Kate Sambo is a lecturer with the Department of English, University of Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria. She is a wife and a mother to three beautiful children. Her research interest is on discourse analysis. Being a bold scholar who has refused to be limited, she has ventured into other fields and published some papers. She is a co-author of four papers in the International Journal of English Language and Communication Studies, Humanity Jos Journal of General Studies and Essays in Language and Literature: A Festschrift in Honour of Prof. Uwemedimo E. Iwoketok. Sambo is currently pursuing her Ph.D.

References

Abidemi, O. M. (2011). The mythological ICONS in Amos Tutuola the Palm-Wine Drinkard. University of Ilorin.

Bamiro, O. E. (1996). The Pragmatics of English in African Literature. University of Saskatchewan: Revista de Lenguas para Fines Específicos. N° 3.

Belcher, W. L. (2021). Early African Literature: An Anthology of Written Texts from 3000 BCE to 1900 CE. wbelcher@ucla.edu.

Essuman, J., Ben-Daniels, F., & Ohene-Adu, K. B. (2021). Satire in post-independence African plays: A study of Efo Kodjo Mawugbe’s Prison Graduates (2015). Research Journal in Advanced Humanities, 2(1). Retrieved from https://royalliteglobal.com/advanced-humanities/article/view/500

Larson, C. R. (2001). The Ordeal of the African Writer. London: Zed Books.

Lindfors, B. (1970). Amos Tutuola: Debts and Assets. Cahiers d’Études Africaines ©EHESS Volume 10 Numéro 38 .

Ngara, E. (1982). Stylistic criticism and African novel: A study of the Language Art and Content of African Fiction. Heinemann Education Books Inc.

Sunusanar (2006). Narrative Craft and Use of Language in Amos Tutuola´s My Life in the Bush of Ghost and the Palmwine Drinkard. Sunusanar Site des étudiants et anciens de l’Université Gaston Berger de Saint-Louis (Sanar). Retrieved from http://www.sunusanar.com

Tutuola, A. (1962). The Palm-wine Drinkard. London: Faber and Faber Limited.

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Published

2021-06-09

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Section

Articles

How to Cite

An analysis of Amos Tutuola’s Palm Wine Drinkard. (2021). Studies in Aesthetics & Art Criticism, 1(1). https://www.royalliteglobal.com/saac/article/view/634