Racial interference in the justice systems in John Grisham’s A Time to Kill (1989) and The Chamber (1994)

https://doi.org/10.58256/hjlcs.v4i3.898

Authors

  • Gideon Kiplangat Too Department of Literature and Languages, Mount Kenya University, Kenya
  • Margaret Njoki Mwihia Department of Literature and Languages, Mount Kenya University, Kenya
  • Peter Muhoro Mwangi Department of Literature and Languages, Mount Kenya University, Kenya

Abstract

Premised on the tenets of intertextuality and structuralism, this study sought to examine how racism has influenced the administration of justice in the two selected texts of John Grisham, A Time to Kill, and The Chamber. It further sought to immerse the practice of law right inside the societal space where reality is supreme so that law is understood alongside human experiences and conditions. Law as it exists as written law is one thing; it is the other to juxtapose and read these set of rules together with the situations in real life. The main objective of this study was to carry out reading of legal representation in selected fiction of John Grisham and critically analyse the influence of legal fiction on law and justice. The study established that racism available within the judicial structures affected administration of justice in the selected texts. This paper after carrying out the study established that in the American society where John Grisham’s texts are set, administration of justice was at different levels in the judicial systems interfered by socials aspects such as racism, organized crimes amongst other aspects but this paper will focus on racism.

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Published

2022-09-28

How to Cite

Too, G. K., Mwihia, M. N., & Mwangi, P. M. (2022). Racial interference in the justice systems in John Grisham’s A Time to Kill (1989) and The Chamber (1994). Hybrid Journal of Literary and Cultural Studies, 4(3), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.58256/hjlcs.v4i3.898

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